There is still time to take part in Tax Credit for First Time Home Buyers! Program ends April 30th.

As part of its plan to stimulate the U.S. housing market and address the economic challenges facing our nation, Congress has passed new legislation that:

Extended the First-Time Home Buyer Tax Credit of up to $8,000 to first-time home buyers until April 30, 2010.
Expands the credit to grant up to $6,500 credit to current home owners purchasing a new or existing home between November 7, 2009 and April 30, 2010.
Here is more information about how the Extended Home Buyer Tax Credit can help prospective home buyers become part of the American dream. If you have specific questions or need additional information, please contact a tax professional or the Internal Revenue Service at 800-829-1040.

Recent news:
Who Qualifies for the Extended Credit?
First-time home buyers who purchase homes between November 7, 2009 and April 30, 2010.

Current home owners purchasing a home between November 7, 2009 and April 30, 2010, who have used the home being sold or vacated as a principal residence for five consecutive years within the last eight.
To qualify as a “first-time home buyer” the purchaser or his/her spouse may not have owned a residence during the three years prior to the purchase.

If you purchased a home between January 1, 2009 and November 6, 2009, please see: 2009 First-Time Home Buyer Tax Credit.

Which Properties Are Eligible?
The Extended Home Buyer Tax Credit may be applied to primary residences, including: single-family homes, condos, townhomes, and co-ops.

How Much Is Available?
The maximum allowable credit for first-time home buyers is $8,000.
The maximum allowable credit for current homeowners is $6,500.

How is a Buyer’s Credit Amount Determined?
Each home buyer’s tax credit is determined by two additional factors:
*The price of the home.
*The buyer’s income.
Price
Under the Extended Home Buyer Tax Credit, credit may only be awarded on homes purchased for $800,000 or less.

Buyer Income
Under the Extended Home Buyer Tax Credit, which is effective on November 7, 2009, single buyers with incomes up to $125,000 and married couples with incomes up to $225,000—may receive the maximum tax credit.

These income limits have changed from the 2009 First-Time Home Buyer Tax Credit limits. If you purchased a home between January 1, 2009 and November 6, 2009, please see 2009 First-Time Home Buyer Tax Credit.

If the Buyer(s)’ Income Exceeds These Limits, Can He/She Still Get a Credit?
Yes, some buyers may still be eligible for the credit.

The credit decreases for buyers who earn between $125,000 and $145,000 for single buyers and between $225,000 and $245,000 for home buyers filing jointly. The amount of the tax credit decreases as his/her income approaches the maximum limit. Home buyers earning more than the maximum qualifying income—over $145,000 for singles and over $245,000 for couples are not eligible for the credit.

Can a Buyer Still Qualify If He/She Closes After April 30, 2010?
Under the Extended Home Buyer Tax Credit, as long as a written binding contract to purchase is in effect on April 30, 2010, the purchaser will have until July 1, 2010 to close.

Will the Tax Credit Need to Be Repaid?
No. The buyer does not need to repay the tax credit, if he/she occupies the home for three years or more. However, if the property is sold during this three-year period, the full amount credit will be recouped on the sale.

Waiting to purchase a home until spring could cost buyers lots more money!

Dont wait to purchase a home! Waiting will cost you $$$ Thousands More This Spring.

First time home buyers can get a tax credit for UP to $8000.00 with a binding contract dated before April 30, 2010.

Also established is a tax credit of up to $6,500 for qualified move-up/repeat home buyers (existing home owners) purchasing a principal residence on or before April 30, 2010. Qualified long term home owners must have owned and resided in the same home for at least five consecutive years of the eight years prior to the purchase date. For married taxpayers, both spouses are required to have lived in the in the home for atleast 5 years with this being confirmed by reviewing the homeownership history. That is, both spouses must qualify as long-time residents, with at least five years of principal residency for each.
One plus is that repeat home buyers do not have to purchase a home that is more expensive than their previous home to qualify for the tax credit.

Now on to more changes in the works..that could add up at the closing table. The Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is to implement several changes for loans guaranteed by the Federal Housing Authority (FHA).

Coming just weeks before the April 30 deadline for the Home Buyer Tax Credit and just days after the March 31 expiration of the Federal Reserve Board’s mortgage backed securities purchase program (which has kept home loan rates low for over a year), these FHA changes make it even more important to act now to save big.

Here are a few reasons why:

On April 5th, the cost of required up-front mortgage insurance for loans guaranteed by the FHA will increase from 1.75% to 2.25%. For a borrower purchasing a $200,000 home with a $7,000 down payment, the up-front mortgage insurance will increase by $965. Up-front mortgage insurance is typically financed in the final loan amount so the impact to a monthly payment will be minimal but overall, the increase is still borne by the borrower both upfront and monthly.

Later this spring, the amount of money that a seller can return to the buyer from their sale proceeds will be reduced from 6% to 3%. The reduction in these “seller concessions” can increase the amount of cash a buyer will be required to pay at closing by $6,000 for a home purchase of $200,000.

There is only one way to avoid being affected by all of these costly changes that lie ahead – Call or email me so I can help you not only find the home of your dreams but to also help you save money.

Are you ready to buy, or waiting out the recession?

I would love it if you all would please post on my website your thoughts on the economic conditions so that I and others can have your input in regards to purchasing homes while the economy is in a recession. In this real estate market there are positives and negatives regarding buying or selling a home.

On the good side first-time home buyers have the same advantage they have always had, which is that they do not have to sell their old place before buying a new one.  This purchase is a positive for the economy, plus once the first-time home buyer purchases the home it leaves the door open for the seller to move on or up to a larger home which continues to help stimulate the economy.

Unfortunately for sellers home prices have dropped significantly especially with all the foreclosures and short sales on the market.  Depending on where the home is located it may be a few years before home prices begin to move in an upward direction.

Post to me your thoughts!  Also, keep working on your credit score and saving towards your new home.

www.pattimace.com (http://www NULL.pattimace NULL.com),  or patti@pattimace.com (patti null@null pattimace NULL.com)

hope to hear from you all….

Found Your Dream Home – What’s Next?

After looking at the comparables for the area a reasonable offer for the home of your dreams is agreed upon and your realtor will submit to the sellers real estate agent. Once submitted, the Sellers agent will come back with an accepted offer, or the negotiations will begin until an agreement is met.  With Foreclosures or Short Sales the time frame will be longer. Foreclosures can take up to 60 days from offer acceptance to closing.

Now that the offer is accepted the contract is sent over by your realtor to the Mortgage Broker or Bank and they will start the loan completion process.  Up until now you as the buyer have a pre-approval letter.  It is your mortgage broker/bankers’ responsiblity to stay on top of getting your loan closed.  There will be various documents needed to complete this process.  Whatever you do, do not go purchase anything on credit that might change your approval status

While this is going on there is an option period that you as a buyer can pay a small fee normally $10 a day for 10days.  This will give you time to have the home inspected to ensure there is no costly damage, such as foundation or roof repairs needed and to ensure no termite damage.

Once the inspection is done and the loan is approval process is completed  the mortgage folks will order an appraisal, and the title company orders the survey,

This process is normally done within a 30 day period unless it is a foreclosure and then it can take longer. Before you go to closing your realtor will receive a HUD statement which breaks down the expenses for closing on the home and will let you know what $$ amount is needed. There are a lot of documents that must be signed so expect the closing to take about 45 minutes.

Heres to wishing you luck on your new home purchase, give me a call I will help you….www.pattimace.com or pattimace@sbcglobal.net (pattimace null@null sbcglobal NULL.net).

Talk again soon,

Patti

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